Frigg: Black Female-Led Brand Advocates for Authentic Beauty

Frigg

Kimberly Dillon’s new CBD brand is about to make a big mark on the world of CBD wellness. 

New CBD businesses are coming online constantly, but it’s not every day that one of the cannabis industry’s leading consultants starts their own line. 

Frigg, which just launched in July, is the brainchild of Kimberly Dillon, the former CMO of wellness-focused cannabis and CBD brand, Papa & Barkley. Judging by the early signs, her new venture is already set to be one of the hot new CBD brands of the 2020 summer. 

Combining luxury with accessibility, the brand departs from the usual tincture/gummy/vape fare, with a pared down line of products for hair and face. There’s also a Beauty Rest CBD Tea, which falls nicely into line with the company’s focus on holistic beauty products.

To be clear, these are definitely wellness products, but for Dillon, the idea of creating another “wellness space” didn’t exactly make her heart pitter-patter. By her own account, her vision for Frigg was actually defined, at least in part, in opposition to her experience in those spaces that did not seem to have room for everyone:

“In designing Frigg, I wanted a brand that was warm, inviting, and educational. And while I have never fully felt comfortable in wellness spaces, which seemed so exclusionary, quiet, and restrictive, I knew the restorative benefits of holistic, plant-based wellness.”

Creating her own CBD brand may seem like an obvious choice for a woman in the cannabis industry. But Dillon didn’t have her own CBD conversion story until she was fully immersed in the cannabis industry, “selling the idea of “chill” while being anything but.” 

But in 2017 she hit a wall. Until that moment, stress had been merely a background nuisance to slog through. Then she started noticing more hair in the sink than usual. And then sleep became elusive.

We are cracking the door on a conversation about mental well-being, exhaustion, and how stress can impact us internally and externally, even if it's disguised as dry skin, insomnia, or an itchy scalp.

To recover, she took a three-week jungle vacation, and when her baggage was lost, ended up using a bottle of CBD left over from a trade show as her only beauty product.  For those three weeks, that bottle of CBD oil was her hair oil, face oil, ointment for insect bites, and her  ”take-at-night-to-help-me-sleep oil.”

And she began to notice changes – that her skin was incredibly smooth, that her hair was thicker, and that her scalp hurt less. After years of working in the cannabis space, CBD had her attention. 

As the vision for Frigg began to form, Dillon knew that she wanted a company that was vibrant, playful, and bold. And she wanted to create a space that would open the conversation on mental well-being for women of color. 

In her words: “Topics like anxiety or even just everyday stressors were not talked about amongst my community. But hair growth and beauty were.” 

Of course, as a leader in the cannabis industry, when it came to formulating her own products she had a big leg up on most people starting out with CBD.

“Since I was already working in the wellness space, I was able to talk to some of the world’s top researchers and scientists. I remember one conversation about inflammation for a caregiver that inflammation was a sign that the body was off-balance. Overworked. Stressed. And so I developed a sandwich approach of taking CBD internally and externally, boosted by other plant remedies.”

Frigg embodies a modern vision of luxury that goes well beyond sleek marketing and a high price point. This kind of luxury means accountability, transparent sourcing, and top quality ingredients.

As one of the few women of color in the cannabis industry (according to MJ Biz Daily, only about 5% of senior roles in the cannabis industry are held by women of color), Dillon has been outspoken on how she sees her role:

“One of the reasons why [Frigg] is so special to me is 1) I want to destigmatize cannabis/CBD/hemp use in my communities and I also wanted to lead the charge for black entrepreneurship in the space. There are so few black businesses in Cannabis, despite the gross injustice of the war on drugs.” 

And lest we forget that the legalization of CBD didn’t just magically put an end to the social justice fallout of decades of cannabis prohibition:

“Legalization IS social justice. Also let’s not whitewash CBD either, cause that’s Cannabis too, no matter what a marketer tells you.”

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