Relaxing With Her Dachshund Dog

CBD for Pets – The Basics

Why might pet owners want to use CBD for dogs and other furry friends? Like people, dogs, cats, and other mammals have an endocannabinoid system 1 Cannabinoid Receptors and the Endocannabinoid System: Signaling and Function in the Central Nervous System Zou, S., & Kumar, U. (2018). Cannabinoid Receptors and the Endocannabinoid System: Signaling and Function in the Central Nervous System. International journal of molecular sciences, 19(3), 833. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19030833 National Institute Of Health . What's more, animals also suffer from many of the same diseases and ailments as people, such as epilepsy 2 Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial to assess the effect of oral cannabidiol administration in addition to conventional antiepileptic treatment on seizure frequency in dogs with intractable idiopathic epilepsy Mcgrath, S., Bartner, L. R., Rao, S., Packer, R. A., & Gustafson, D. L. (2019). Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial to assess the effect of oral cannabidiol administration in addition to conventional antiepileptic treatment on seizure frequency in dogs with intractable idiopathic epilepsy. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 254(11), 1301–1308. doi: 10.2460/javma.254.11.1301 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association , chronic pain 3 A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of daily cannabidiol for the treatment of canine osteoarthritis pain, PAIN APA Verrico, Chris D.1,2,+; Wesson, Shonda3,+; Konduri, Vanaja4; Hofferek, Colby J.4; Vazquez-Perez, Jonathan4; Blair, Emek5; Dunner, Kenneth Jr6; Salimpour, Pedram7; Decker, William K.4,8,9,+,*; Halpert, Matthew M.4,+ A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of daily cannabidiol for the treatment of canine osteoarthritis pain, PAIN: April 24, 2020 - Volume Articles in Press - Issue - doi: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001896 International Association for the Study of Pain , and anxiety 4 NIH to investigate minor cannabinoids and terpenes for potential pain-relieving properties. NIH to investigate minor cannabinoids and terpenes for potential pain-relieving properties. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.nccih.nih.gov/news/press-releases/nih-to-investigate-minor-cannabinoids-and-terpenes-for-potential-painrelieving-properties Search Results Web results National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health . It seems intuitive that if there are positive results from human use, CBD for pets might work too… right?  

CBD Products for Pets

When it comes to CBD for pets, you won’t find yourself limited to tinctures or oils. There are also gel capsules that contain a certain amount of CBD, so you can know precisely how much your pet is ingesting. Flavored treats are another option, especially if your dog or cat loves getting snacks in the middle of the day! Some companies, such as Holistapet, have gone a step further to make CBD catnip spray and pellets for horses.

Everything you need and your pupper need to know about CBD and their health.

Pet Owner Using CBD Oil Drops For Her Cat

Is the CBD the yin to catnips yang? Cats are often very anxious animals and CBD may be just what they need to chill out.

CBD for Dogs

You’ve come to the right place to find out everything about CBD and dogs. Why might a pet owner want to use CBD for dogs? Most are interested in the potential therapeutic effects of CBD to help their dog cope with anxiety and pain. As many of us are familiar with, dogs often find loud and bustling human festivities, such as fireworks on the 4th of July, extremely scary. And no one wants to see their dog quivering in a ball under the bed, for any reason. CBD dog treats for anxiety might be an option for your canine if you find them in fear. So far, veterinarians have observed that CBD does seem to help with anxiety and fear, specifically associated with loud noises. Also, these treats are not supposed to have a strong sedative effect, which helps ensure your pet isn’t missing out on the party fun. In some cases, dogs become somewhat subdued after taking CBD, but they rarely show other negative effects 8 CHF Announces Funding for Clinical Trial to Study Cannabidiol to Treat Drug Resistant Epilepsy in Dogs. Brady, B. (2017, September 6). CHF Announces Funding for Clinical Trial to Study Cannabidiol to Treat Drug Resistant Epilepsy in Dogs. Retrieved from https://www.akcchf.org/news-events/news/clinical-trial-to-study.html National Institute of Health .

 

 

CBD for Cats

Unfortunately, there aren’t that many studies on CBD for dogs yet, and there are even less on CBD for cats. But we took a comprehensive look at what was out there to provide you with all the information you’ll need about CBD for cats. In general, cannabidiol appears safe for cats, typically affecting felines less than dogs, but researchers cautioned that more extensive experiments are needed to know for sure 6 Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Preliminary Safety Assessment with Use of CBD-Rich Hemp Nutraceutical in Healthy Dogs and Cats Deabold, K. A., Schwark, W. S., Wolf, L., & Wakshlag, J. J. (2019). Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Preliminary Safety Assessment with Use of CBD-Rich Hemp Nutraceutical in Healthy Dogs and Cats. Animals : an open access journal from MDPI, 9(10), 832. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9100832 National Institute of Health . When CBD was given in oil form to cats, either directly via a syringe or mixed into food, blood tests showed that cats absorbed far less CBD than dogs did. Overall, none of the cats in the studies showed severe, negative reactions to CBD.

CBD for Horses

CBD studies on animals other than dogs and cats are almost non-existent. Due to a lack of available research to draw conclusions from, an announcement was put out by the Tacoma Equine Hospital concluded that veterinarians could not recommend CBD for horses. There are just too many unknowns, including the best way to administer CBD, the dosage, the effect on major organs such as the liver, and how CBD could interact with other drugs that the animal is taking 10 Not to Stir the Pot But… Equine, T. (2019, April 20). Not to Stir the Pot But… Retrieved from https://www.tacomaequine.com/post/2019/04/19/cbd Equine, T. . If future studies do come out, they will most likely focus on safety first before delving into the therapeutic uses of CBD for horses.

How to Use CBD Pet Products

Animal studies showed that there is a correlation between the amount of CBD absorbed and its effectiveness 7 Dietary fats and pharmaceutical lipid excipients increase systemic exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines Zgair, A., Wong, J. C., Lee, J. B., Mistry, J., Sivak, O., Wasan, K. M., Hennig, I. M., Barrett, D. A., Constantinescu, C. S., Fischer, P. M., & Gershkovich, P. (2016). Dietary fats and pharmaceutical lipid excipients increase systemic exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines. American journal of translational research, 8(8), 3448–3459. National Institute of Health . This means that mixing CBD oil for pets or CBD products with food is the easiest and best way for the intestines to absorb it. If you’re a cannabis user yourself, you may notice that edibles take longer to kick in compared to smoking or vaping. Why is this? When you eat something, the food travels the course of your digestive system, from your mouth through your esophagus, stomach, and small intestines. This process usually takes a few hours. After absorption, the liver has to process all the nutrients, including the CBD or THC you’ve consumed. It’s not until the liver has released these chemicals into your bloodstream and they reach your brain that you feel their effects.

When it comes to animals, you’ll want to mix the CBD product in with their food, preferably something oily or fat-based like canned wet food instead of dry kibbles. CBD dissolves better in fats and oils, and there’s a better chance that your pet absorbs more. If you don’t want to wait until mealtime, CBD infused treats are your best bet. Once consumed, wait for about 30 minutes and observe any changes in behavior. Your pet might seem calmer and less anxious when the CBD has kicked in. You can do the same 30-minute wait after giving CBD oil or gel capsules.

Types of CBD Pet Products

CBD Treats

These CBD products look just like regular dog or cat treats. There is a specific amount of CBD in each treat, so you know exactly how much your pet is getting.

CBD Oils

These products usually come in a little jar with an eyedropper. You can use this eyedropper to measure out the CBD dosage for dogs and other pets, then mix the product in with their regular food.

CBD Capsules

Capsules aren’t as messy as oil, but your pet probably won’t eat one like a treat. You can mix gel capsules in with food or wrap it up in a treat.

CBD Sprays

CBD is mixed with water via an emulsifier to create sprays. Each puff contains a very low dose of CBD that you can spray onto toys for your pet to inhale or lick and enjoy.

Where to find CBD Products for Pets

With so many options out there, it’s challenging to decide which CBD product is best for your pet. We looked at several brands and judged them based on value, quality, and variety. We don’t want you to blow your budget buying overpriced products. Plus, we want to make sure that the brands we recommend test their products thoroughly and provide their customers with an array of CBD products to choose form. So, check out one of our favorite brands, Treatibles, and the variety of CBD products they have.

holistaapet catnip spray

Holistapet is one the most popular brands going. They have a wide variety of CBD products for all types of pets.

Treatibles Soft Chew dog snacks

Treatibles has an amazing line of products for dogs that we're sure you canine friend will love

Sources
  1. Zou, S., & Kumar, U. (2018). Cannabinoid Receptors and the Endocannabinoid System: Signaling and Function in the Central Nervous System. International journal of molecular sciences, 19(3), 833. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19030833
  2. Mcgrath, S., Bartner, L. R., Rao, S., Packer, R. A., & Gustafson, D. L. (2019). Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial to assess the effect of oral cannabidiol administration in addition to conventional antiepileptic treatment on seizure frequency in dogs with intractable idiopathic epilepsy. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 254(11), 1301–1308. doi: 10.2460/javma.254.11.1301
  3. APA Verrico, Chris D.1,2,+; Wesson, Shonda3,+; Konduri, Vanaja4; Hofferek, Colby J.4; Vazquez-Perez, Jonathan4; Blair, Emek5; Dunner, Kenneth Jr6; Salimpour, Pedram7; Decker, William K.4,8,9,+,*; Halpert, Matthew M.4,+ A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of daily cannabidiol for the treatment of canine osteoarthritis pain, PAIN: April 24, 2020 - Volume Articles in Press - Issue - doi: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001896
  4. NIH to investigate minor cannabinoids and terpenes for potential pain-relieving properties. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.nccih.nih.gov/news/press-releases/nih-to-investigate-minor-cannabinoids-and-terpenes-for-potential-painrelieving-properties
  5. Silver R. J. (2019). The Endocannabinoid System of Animals. Animals : an open access journal from MDPI, 9(9), 686. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9090686
  6. Deabold, K. A., Schwark, W. S., Wolf, L., & Wakshlag, J. J. (2019). Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Preliminary Safety Assessment with Use of CBD-Rich Hemp Nutraceutical in Healthy Dogs and Cats. Animals : an open access journal from MDPI, 9(10), 832. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9100832
  7. Zgair, A., Wong, J. C., Lee, J. B., Mistry, J., Sivak, O., Wasan, K. M., Hennig, I. M., Barrett, D. A., Constantinescu, C. S., Fischer, P. M., & Gershkovich, P. (2016). Dietary fats and pharmaceutical lipid excipients increase systemic exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines. American journal of translational research, 8(8), 3448–3459.
  8. Brady, B. (2017, September 6). CHF Announces Funding for Clinical Trial to Study Cannabidiol to Treat Drug Resistant Epilepsy in Dogs. Retrieved from https://www.akcchf.org/news-events/news/clinical-trial-to-study.html
  9. Vaughn, D., Kulpa, J., & Paulionis, L. (2020). Preliminary Investigation of the Safety of Escalating Cannabinoid Doses in Healthy Dogs. Frontiers in veterinary science, 7, 51. https://doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2020.00051
  10. Equine, T. (2019, April 20). Not to Stir the Pot But... Retrieved from https://www.tacomaequine.com/post/2019/04/19/cbd

you must be at least 21 to view this website

Sorry, you have to be of legal age to visit this site.